Category: olive oil

Olive oil cake with orange zest, rum & pistachios.

Orange, pistachio & rum olive oil cake.

Yeah, I know. I know. It’s the beginning of June, and “who wants to be baking in a hot house?” I get it. I really do, no one knows better than I do about how horrid it is to bake a big complicated cake or bread in 90° weather.

But… this is OLIVE OIL CAKE. It’s easy. It’s refreshing, citrus-y, it travels well and it has rum in it. It’s like the perfect summer cake.

Believe me.

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Snack time with Milton’s! A delicious ricotta dip… and a giveaway!

*****COMMENTS CLOSED! 1/25/13*****

*The winner is… EILEEN! Comment #21*

Eileen- Milton's Cracker winner!

 -Thanks to everyone who entered! -

***********************

Yep. Today I’m going to be giving away a TON of crackers from Milton’s Craft Bakers, but first, I’m going to give you an easy recipe idea. A really, really easy dip recipe for any party, football game- or even just for movie night!

Baked ricotta dip with mozzarella, garlic, olive oil & basil. Goes great with Milton's Craft Bakers gourmet crackers!

I love dip. I love any kind of dip; hot, cold, room temperature, cheese, onion, vegetable, sweet, salty, creamy, tangy, savory, etc. And I love any kind of vehicle to eat aforementioned dip. I’m a snack person. I can make a meal out of snack foods. But crackers? I looooove crackers. I love crackers with 5 o’s, that’s how much I love them. I eat crackers plain. I eat ‘em with cheese. I eat ‘em with dip… and this hot baked ricotta dip is just the thing.

It’s easy to make, bakes up quick and you can make it in as large or small a batch as you need!

Baked ricotta dip & Milton's gourmet crackers. (click for recipe)

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Deep dish “pizza in a cake pan.”

Deep dish cake pan pizza! So easy!

If there’s one thing you take away from this post, it’s this: pizza is good.

There are people who will tell you it isn’t. There are folks who demonize it, bitch about the cheese or the amount of carbs. There are people who claim it’s greasy & unhealthy or who say things like “Wow, look, a heart attack on a plate.” Those people aren’t your friend. Sure, they disguise themselves as “friends.” But really, anyone who tries to tell you that pizza is bad is a horrible person.

Pizza isn’t bad. Pizza isn’t at fault.

People who eat pizza four times a day, every day, and eat themselves obese? They’re at fault. Those people who don’t get any exercise, eat crappy diets & then get sick & blame cheeseburgers or pizza? It still doesn’t make pizza- or burgers- the bad guy. Pizza isn’t an every day, all day meal. Neither are cupcakes. Or ice cream. Or cheeseburgers. And if you can’t understand that, and you’re blaming food, then honestly you need to sit down & re-examine your life. STOP BLAMING FOOD. STOP LABELING THINGS LIKE BREAD AS “BAD.” BREAD IS NOT BAD. You are bad for food shaming people. YOU are the asshole. By telling people to stop eating carbs or fats or sugar altogether you aren’t educating them in a good diet, you’re making them feel bad. Not to mention spreading false nutritional information, because since when has one or two slices of pizza- or even a whole pie, really- made anyone fat? Never, that’s when.

And let me just say this: one of the things that totally drive me nuts/insane/bananas/bonkers/pick a word about having a food blog that isn’t loaded down with quinoa or gluten-free fad diet stuff are the questions. Ohhh, the questions. Such as…

“Oh mah gah, like how do you NOT weigh 1,000 pounds!?”

“Holy crap if I ate like this I’d be a freakin’ WHALE! How do you stay so skinny?”

“Where do you put all this food??? You’re so thin!”

“Marilla, seriously, how are you able to eat all of this?”

“No really… how is it possible your house is full of delicious treats and you don’t eat them all?”

Have you ever heard of self-control? Moderation? COMMON SENSE? Do you HONESTLY think I eat nothing but cupcakes & pizza four times a day every single day? What planet do you come from? I eat a shit-ton of salads & vegetables, but who the hell wants to read about that? I certainly don’t. Salads are boring. Delicious, yes, but not interesting. Trained monkeys can figure out how to make a good salad, let’s face it, it’s not that hard. Also… these people asking these questions are clearly not food bloggers. Because if they were they’d realize that by the time the food is prepared, cooked & done, the photos are set-up & taken & every one else has eaten, we’re too damn tired to eat or to do anything but nap.

Deep dish cake pan pizza: how to make deep dish pizza the easy way, from the dough up. NO MIXER REQUIRED!Side note: isn’t it funny I posted ice cream and pizza within a few days of one another? I think so. Junk food done right!

Okay now that that’s out of the way, let’s get into the good, positive pizza talk. ‘Cause everybody loves pizza! Well, unless you’re one of those buzzkills I mentioned above, anyway… but who cares about them? 

Being from New York, I especially love pizza. I’m partial to New York pizza, of course, but I do love me some deep dish. Thick, oiled crust, gooey cheese. Oh man. It’s some good stuff. I could live on pizza, really. Although like I said- that’s not exactly feasible… either way, I love it. I also love making my own pizza, as is evidenced by the four or five different recipes I have posted on this blog alone! Making your own dough is not as hard as you think it is, even if you don’t have a stand mixer with a dough hook you can make your own awesome pizza dough.

EASY PIZZA DOUGH RECIPE

Makes two 8″ deep dish cake pan pizzas, one 9″x13″ pizza or 3-4 free form thin crust pizzas

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 teaspoons active dry yeast (not instant)
  • 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 cups lukewarm water

Directions:

  1. Sift the flour and salt into a large bowl. Stir in the yeast, then make a well in the center.
  2. Add the olive oil and the 2 cups lukewarm water.
  3. Mix until a soft dough forms. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead gently for 5 minutes.
  4. Set aside in an oiled bowl and cover the bowl with a clean dishtowel.

 Deep dish cake pan pizza with easy homemade dough.

How good does that look? Drool-worthy. And EASY. I promise you, it’s very, very easy.

DEEP DISH CAKE PAN PIZZA

Ingredients:

  • 1 batch homemade pizza dough (if using frozen or refrigerated, thaw & let it come to room temp)
  • 2 cups marinara sauce or sauce of your liking, homemade or store-bought (this sauce works well), or, two large tomatoes sliced & patted dry
  • 2 cups mozzarella cheese, grated or sliced
  • shredded or finely grated parmesan cheese (I used a combination of both)
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried basil
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • sliced pepperoni, crumbled ground beef, or any toppings of your choice

To make the pizza:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425° F and get two 8″ cake pans ready.
  2. Add 3 tablespoons olive oil, 2 teaspoons minced garlic, and 1/4 teaspoon each of dried basil & oregano in a small saucepan. Heat gently until it smells like it’s ready. Turn off the heat & brush the cake pans with it fairly liberally.
  3. Divide the dough in half. Press each ball into it’s own cake pan. If it springs back too much, let it rest for 5 minutes and try again. Punch & press it into the pan, pushing & pulling the “crust” over the top of the pans by roughly 1/2″.
  4. Brush the crust part with the olive oil mixture and sprinkled a handful of shredded parmesan and a 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese over the bottom of each of the pizza crusts. Bake in the oven for 10 minutes.
  5. Remove the pizzas and add the sauce or sliced tomatoes and then the remaining mozzarella cheese, as well as any toppings you might want to add. Sprinkle with more parmesan (I used grated for the tops), add a basil leaf (if desired) and put back into the oven for 15-20 minutes or until sauce is bubbly & crust is golden.
  6. Remove from the oven and set aside for 10 minutes before cutting. This dough also works when made in a single 9″ x 12″ baking dish or pan for a “Sicilian”-styled pizza. Cooking directions for that pan size can be found here.

I’d avoid using fresh mozzarella for this as it can be too watery and make your pizza too soupy. If you do use it, make sure it’s drained thoroughly & patted dry as much as possible. Also, if you make your own sauce for it, try using fire-roasted tomatoes. I guarantee you you’ll never want to use a regular can of tomatoes again. And be sure to use fresh tomatoes that have been patted dry of all liquid as well, if you aren’t using sauce & you’re taking the fresh tomato option.

Serve with more cheese, preferably while singing “That’s Amore.” Red gingham tablecloth & bottle of chianti with the straw bottom optional.

Deep dish cake pan pizza!

P.S. the tiki mug giveaway ends TONIGHT at 11:59 p.m. EST! Don’t miss out!

Summertime… and the livin’s easy.

“August rain: the best of the summer gone, and the new fall not yet born. The odd uneven time.”
-Sylvia Plath

 

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Summer has pretty much all but flown by, hasn’t it? Seems like yesterday I posted a little group of pictures of the start of summer… & now all the Back-to-School stuff has infiltrated the stores & it seems as though summer is breathing its last breaths. Not only that, but we’ve been really getting pounded with rain, and when it’s a cool day combined with rain it seems far more like fall than summer. As far as I’m concerned, there’s plenty of summer left. But I don’t think many other people agree with me. Which sucks, actually, because I feel like I’m being forced to buy sweaters and trench coats and rain boots and I AM NOT READY FOR THAT. I’m still playing in the garden, enjoying the sunshine, wearing tank tops, cutoffs & flip flops. I won’t automatically shift into “fall mode” in late August and you can’t make me. It’s been raining a lot here lately, actually, and quite heavily. But despite the rain, it’s still warm, and I’m getting a little tired of emptying the water out of my fire pit and trying to keep my plants alive and standing. Oh, August rain. You can tell, though, that there’s a change in the air. The breeze is different, the sun patterns are different. Fall is coming.

However… those days when it’s still over 85° degrees with insane humidity and the sun is beating down on me brutally, I’m reminded that yes, it is indeed still summer. So I’m relishing it. Still having picnics & cook-outs on my insect plates!

;

But at this time of year I feel like a kid- you know how it is when you’re young, and when it’s still summer, and you’re inhaling the scent of chlorine off your skin, catching bugs in jars, staying up late & peeling the sunburned skin off your back… but everyone else (read: adults) seems to be talking about what textbooks you need, who ended up in Mrs. So-and-So’s class, why you need five 3-subject notebooks for Science and whether or not you read your summer reading books (I always did). There’s something to be said for the excitement of shopping for school supplies. The way you feel when you open that notebook and the first page is clean, unruffled and stark white, and it’s similar to the school year itself; right now, it’s a clean slate, anything can happen. It’s filled with promise and the first few weeks (and pages) are nice and smooth. Then it all goes to shit. By the end of the year, the notebook is dog-eared, frayed and probably has no cover left on it, not to mention is stained with almost every lunch you’ve eaten since at least November. Wait, I’m getting off track here. Anyway while there is something to be said for all that newness & excitement… let’s not forget though that the end of summer is officially September 21st, which means fall is technically a little less than one full month away.

There’s still a ton of summer left, true. Lots of beach days (although with no lifeguards), barbecues, warm nights sitting outside until it’s way late, enjoying the nice weather. But the date on the calendar means school starts very soon if it hasn’t already, & those last minute vacations are coming to an end. And most people mark the end of summer as Labor Day, so as summer itself “winds to a close,” it’s time to squeeze in all those summery recipes I didn’t make yet. I said this summer would be the summer of me making stuff I never made before… and that really didn’t go as planned. The summer switched rapidly between being swelteringly hot and torrentially rainy; like some kind of bizarre New York rainforest. So most of the time it was just too hot to cook, even when it rained. I wanted to make Miemo’s mama’s egg rolls, but it was too hot to fry anything! But this is definitely something I never made before that it wasn’t too hot to make: pickled shrimp.

Briny, faintly spicy pickled shrimp are a staple of Southern cuisine. In this Georgia-inspired version from from Hugh Acheson’s A New Turn in the South (Clarkson Potter, 2011), frozen raw shrimp are a fine substitute for fresh. As Hugh notes in his comment below, if the shrimp remain covered with oil, they’ll last for “a good week in the fridge. The longer they sit in their pickle liquid, the picklier they get.”

This recipe first appeared in our October 2011 issue along with Wendell Brock’s book review “Sweet and Tart: A Southerly Course and A New Turn in the South.”

-Saveur

Old Bay Seasoning is something every household should have, at all times. It’s excellent on seafood, yes, but it’s also great for tons of other things: popcorn, french fries, hard-boiled eggs, corn-on-the-cob, etc. If you’ve never had it- get it. I guarantee you you’ll love it. It’s just a simple mix: paprika, mustard, celery seed, ground bay leaf, both black and red pepper, cinnamon, cloves, allspice, nutmeg, cardamom, salt, mace and ginger. But it’s so good. And the little can is so vintage looking!

;

PICKLED SHRIMP (directly from Saveur/Hugh Acheson, with my notes in Italics)

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons Old Bay seasoning
  • 1 lb. (26–30 count) medium shrimp, peeled and deveined (I left the tails on)
  • 1/2 teaspoon celery seeds (I didn’t crush them)
  • 1/4 teaspoon allspice berries (I omitted them)
  • 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup packed flat-leaf parsley leaves, finely chopped (I used a lot less, but mine was dried parsley)
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon crushed red chile flakes
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 12 dried bay leaves
  • 1/2 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced lengthwise (I used a white onion)

Directions:

  1. Bring Old Bay and 8 cups water to a boil in a 4-qt. saucepan; add shrimp, reduce heat to low, and cook until shrimp are pink, about 2 minutes. Drain and transfer to bowl of ice water to chill; drain again.
  2. Finely grind celery seeds and allspice in a spice grinder (I didn’t do this!); transfer to a bowl and stir in oil, juice, parsley, salt, chile flakes, garlic, and bay leaves. In a 1-qt. glass jar, layer shrimp and onions; pour over oil mixture. Cover with lid; chill overnight before serving.

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I hope that you don’t get turned off or stick your nose up at the idea of these. If you like shrimp, and you like a mildy tangy, briny flavor that pickled foods have, then you’ll love these. Plus… anything in olive oil is awesome, am I right? It’s actually the same principle as Ceviche de Camarones, the popular Latin version of a shrimp cocktail. They’re excellent as a side dish to grilled steak, grilled chicken, or even grilled fish. A perfect addition to your Labor Day festivities this weekend. And the oil can be used as a vinaigrette, not to mention if you let the jar come to room temperature & put some of the shrimp & oil over hot pasta, it’s kinda like a cheater’s version of shrimp scampi. You could use them in a kind of Southern taco, too. Roll up some flour tortillas and put some of these bad boys in there with some of the onions and a little lettuce. They’re relatively easy to make, and… they last for a week in the fridge! Just make sure they’re totally submerged & covered with oil at all times. And as with everything, when in doubt- throw it out! If it smells funkadelic or looks weird, toss it. But mine was in the fridge for about 9 days, and on the ninth day it was finally finished and nobody died. Yet. (I kid, I kid)

And yes, like it says above, you can use frozen shrimp. I did! I also left the tails on, obviously. Interactive food, guys, interactive food. Make people work for it. Side note: the oil might coagulate in the refrigerator. Mine actually didn’t fully coagulate for a couple of days, I suspect because of the addition of the lemon juice. But anyway, if you manage to keep them for longer than an evening and they coagulate, all you do is take the jar out a little ahead of time. This way it’ll come to room temperature, liquify & be fine to eat within 15-20 minutes.

Sadness & Peperoncini Sott’Olio.

Ever have one of those days where you really have no idea what to do with yourself? Well since my grandma passed away, I’ve had a lot.

Needless to say, that’s me & my nana, Nov. 1981

We were very close, and I took care of her above & beyond what most grandkids do, so it’s been very hard on me. I must say, people have been wonderful. Incredible. We’ve received such an amazing & overwhelming outpouring of love & support. Every day since July 16th we’ve had tons of phone calls, not to mention all the flowers & cards delivered every day (plus one hugely fantastic Harry & David candy/cookie basket) and almost every day there’s an e-mail in my inbox or a voicemail on my cell phone of people giving their condolences, asking if I’m okay, or just people saying “If there’s anything I can do.” And that’s sweet, and so appreciated.

But the bottom line is, unless you work miracles & can erase the past few weeks- there ain’t shit you can do. Don’t get me wrong: I love the fact that we’re thought of, and that everyone thought so much of her that they’ve been donating money in her memory or sending things in her memory, etc. I love that people care about us. But basically, I have to fend for myself, and figure out how to live with the grief and cope with this on my own, and nobody can help me with that. I found it was best to keep myself busy, and the best way to do that was to do my favorite thing since I’m a child: create. However this time I chose culinary creations; I baked very little, since it was over 100° degrees most days & the sweat poured off my forehead just from watering my garden. So I made tons of pickles, jams, jellies. I immersed myself in homemade sauces, salsas and curds. I read an old cookbook of hers that my grandmother had just given me at Christmas, called The American Woman’s Cookbook, and devoured the section on relishes & chutney’s. I read Food in Jars religiously & scoured Punk Domestics for ideas. I had nothing else to do. My heart was broken (*and still is) and I had no idea how to cope other than to keep my hands & mind busy & to just fill my fridge & cabinets, and everyone else’s, with homemade goods. I went through case after case of jars & lids & bottles of vinegar like it was nobody’s business. I should’ve bought stock in Heinz since my recycling bin was overflowing with Heinz vinegar jugs & bottles. I made so many pickles & jams that I have enough to keep us going through a nuclear war, & gave so many away I showed up at my aunt’s house with a shopping bag of jars & sent my father home with another. Then I just ran out of ideas.

This is all maybe half of what I’ve done. Did you doubt my insanity?

I remembered that my friend Chrisie had sent me her grandma’s recipe for hot Italian peppers in oil. I thought, what better way to give tribute to both our grandma’s who’ve passed away; hers whose recipe it was & mine who loved everything I made & was so proud of it, than to make a few jars of them. Besides, my mother was taking it so hard, obviously, and I knew she loved hot peppers in oil on a sandwich or even a snack. So I made some for her. There are no specific measurements, but it’s easy enough to figure out how much you’ll need. Just buy your peppers first, then figure everything else out as you go. I also had another recipe bookmarked, which I included here, that’s very similar.

I wasn’t going to come back and start writing posts. I wasn’t going to do anything normal for a while. I wasn’t planning on doing any of this. But I really do find it helps me… to write, to create, to do things like everything is normal. I’m not an expert. I did not get a degree in this (or baking), and honestly, if you’re coming here for perfection or all the answers you’re barking up the wrong tree anyway. I find this makes me feel somewhat normal right now, so peperoncini it is.

Peperoncini (or pepperoncini), common names Tuscan peppers, sweet Italian peppers and golden Greek peppers, are a variety of the species Capsicum annuum. While called peperoncini in American English, in Italy these particular kind of peppers are called friggitello (plural friggitelli) or more generally peperone (plural peperoni) like other sweet varieties of peppers, while the term peperoncini (singular peperoncino) is used for hotter varieties of chili peppers.[1] The Greek varieties are sweeter and less bitter than the Italian varieties grown in Tuscany. Peperoncini are mild with a slight heat and a hint of bitterness, and are commonly pickled and sold packaged in jars.

-Wikipedia

These may not be made with actual peperoncini, but for lack of a better term it’s a suitable enough name. Or you could just say ‘peppers in oil.’ That’s easy enough.

Taken immediately after canning… red, yellow & orange bell pepper strips; left & right, and stuffed long hot peppers; middle

CHRISIE’S GRANDMA’S HOT ITALIAN PEPPERS

Ingredients:

  • red, green (or a mixture of both) hot Italian peppers, free of brown spots or bruises (this recipe can also work with jalapenos, sweet or hot banana peppers or chili peppers)
  • white vinegar
  • good olive oil
  • 1 clove of garlic per jar (optional, my addition)
  • seasoned breadcrumbs or anchovies (optional, for stuffing)

Directions:

  1. First, wash peppers remove seeds. If you want to keep them very hot, this step isn’t necessary.
  2. Then blanch peppers in boiling white vinegar. After 2-3 mins in the vinegar, remove immediately. If you choose to stuff them, allow them to cool enough and stuff them tightly with either anchovies or seasoned breadcrumbs, pushing the stuffing down so it’s packed.
  3. Tightly pack the peppers into jars and pour olive oil in leaving a ½ inch headspace. Close jars and use the hot water bath method to create a vacuum seal, processing for 15 minutes for a pint jar, 20 minutes for a quart.
  4. Once sealed, allow jars to cool completely, place in a cool, dark place, and allow 2 weeks before eating. Refrigerate after opening.

CANNED  PEPPERS IN OIL

Ingredients:

  • 2 ¼ pounds fresh, blemish-free peppers of the kind you prefer (I used Bell peppers in orange, yellow and red)
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sea salt or kosher salt (or other salt without additives)
  • an onion, peeled and finely sliced (optional, I didn’t use one)
  • olive oil (see note)
  • enough jars with lids to contain your peppers, cleaned and sterilized (I used wide mouth pints)

Preparation:

  1. Wash the peppers and pat them dry. Next, stem them, split them open lengthwise, seed them, rib them, and cut them into strips (if desired).
  2. Put the vinegar, salt and onion (if you are using it) in a pot over a brisk flame. Add the peppers and heat until the vinegar comes to a boil. Boil the peppers for 3-5 minutes, stirring them about gently. Drain them and dry them — I lined a cookie sheet with paper towels and heated them in a slow oven for about 10 minutes. Pack the peppers in your clean jars and fill them with olive oil, shaking the jars and tapping at their sides to dislodge air bubbles.
  3. Seal the jars, and put them on a rack in a sterilizer (or a large pot) with cold water to cover. Bring the pot to a boil and simmer the peppers for 20 minutes to sterilize them. Let the pot cool, and when you can safely dip a hand into the water remove the jars. Check the seals of the lids, and put the jars in a cool dark place. They’ll be ready in a couple of weeks, and will keep for a year.
Immediately after the waterbath

I used some hot long green peppers (which I stuffed) and some red, yellow and orange peppers (which I cut into strips). I made one jar of stuffed, two of the strips. But you could do a jar of a sort of mixed bag of peppers, too, whatever you like. I used a clove of garlic in with the long peppers and I also stuffed them with breadcrumbs. The strips are more for sandwich purposes, the other are more of a “snack.” I’d recommend waiting at least two weeks before opening for both recipes to optimize the flavor. The oil remaining in the jars is supposedly excellent drizzled on anything. Imagine a garlic bread made with this oil?

Please wear gloves when working with hot peppers. I don’t want anyone to lose an eye or end up in the ER because they wanted to make hot peppers in oil and rubbed their eye – or heaven forbid- their no-no parts with hands that had capsacin on them. And please be aware that the risk of botulism is very high when using oil for canning. DO NOT skip the vinegar step, blanch the peppers in water or rinse them after the vinegar. You need that acidity in the vinegar to keep the spores of nasty stuff out or kill them. The USDA would probably say this is only safe for pressure canning, not water bath canning. Obviously, don’t plan on storing these for a long time. They should be used fairly quickly. And yes, there are going to be people who get crazy over this & tell me I’m going to die if I eat them. But I’m going to go with the fact that as long as I don’t plan on saving them for use as sustenance during the Zombie Apocalypse, I’ll be okay. Also, don’t bother using really high-quality fancy schmancy good-tasting olive oil, the flavor of the peppers will overwhelm any subtle nuances in the olive flavor. Just use a good-quality basic virgin oil, as opposed to extra virgin. If you use Bell peppers cut in strips or small peppers, then you can use half-pint jars just as well without wasting larger jars. I chose to use pint jars for the strips myself but it’s really up to you- hell, you could certainly make a quart or two if you felt like it.

After a few days of “settling”, how gorgeous do those look? Like floating jewels…

……

This is a really easy idea to build on. You could use whole peppers, sliced peppers, stuffed peppers, hot peppers, sweet peppers, mild peppers, etc. You could even roast the peppers first, before or after blanching them, to give a smokier flavor, or add a dash of liquid smoke to the jar. Add garlic, onion, anchovy… whatever. Go nuts.

I promise the cupcakes will be back soon. Just as soon as the weather gives me a break. I can’t wait to bake something.

Olive Oyl (oil) cake.

This is a pretty cool recipe, because it’s something you wouldn’t ordinarily think of putting together: olive oil and cake. Of course, because I have a kind of fetish for associating recipes with pop culture, I immediately thought of Olive Oyl, Popeye‘s girlfriend. It’s really got nothing to do with Popeye, it’s just got olive oil in it. But whatever. It’s my website and I’ll name the cake whatever I want to.

This recipe is a recipe from the Abraço Coffee shop in the East Village, NYC, courtesy of Bon Appétit magazine. It’s an amazingly light, refreshing summery cake and it goes very well with coffee of all kinds. Plus, it’s also an easy and not too sweet treat for me to eat with my effed up wisdom tooth (at least until it’s taken care of next week).

OLIVE OY(i)L CAKE

Ingredients:

  • 1½ cups organic flour
  • 1 cup organic sugar
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 2 large organic eggs
  • ¾ cup organic whole milk
  • ½ cup mild flavored organic olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated orange peel

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 325. Oil and flour 9″x5″x3″ metal loaf pan.
  2. Whisk first 5 ingredients in a large bowl. Whisk eggs, milks, olive oil and orange peel in medium bowl to blend. Gradually whisk egg mixture into dry ingredients. Transfer to prepared pan.
  3. Bake cake until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 60-65 minutes.
  4. Cool in pan on rack for 20 minutes. Invert pan to remove cake. Cool completely, top side up.

I love the orange flavor in this cake. It’s subtle and delicious. I could seriously eat the whole loaf myself. But I won’t.