Category: treats

Chocolate toffee sea salt matzoh treats.

Getting bored of eating unleavened bread? Are you certain that you’re going to wind up with leftover Matzoh? Lemme upgrade ya.

Chocolate toffee sea salt matzoh.

You most definitely read that correctly; this is chocolate toffee sea salt matzoh. It’s like matzoh candy. Matzoh bark. I know I’ve left you guys hanging without any posts since April 1st. I hope this makes up for it, ’cause it’s pretty awesome.

Chocolate toffee matzoh with sea salt.

Matzoh, for those of you who don’t know (where do you live, under a rock?!) is an unleavened bread usually-not but not always- made for and eaten at Passover.

There are numerous explanations behind the symbolism of matzo. One is historical: Passover is a commemoration of the exodus from Egypt. The biblical narrative relates that the Israelites left Egypt in such haste they could not wait for their bread dough to rise; the bread, when baked, was matzo. (Exodus 12:39). The other reason for eating matzo is symbolic: On the one hand, matzo symbolizes redemption and freedom, but it is also lechem oni, “poor man’s bread”. Thus it serves as a reminder to be humble, and to not forget what life was like in servitude. Also, leaven symbolizes corruption and pride as leaven “puffs up”. Eating the “bread of affliction” is both a lesson in humility and an act that enhances the appreciation of freedom.

Another explanation is that matzo has been used to replace the pesach, or the traditional Passover offering that was made before the destruction of the Temple. During the Seder the third time the matzo is eaten it is preceded with the Sephardic rite, “zekher l’korban pesach hane’ekhal al hasova”. This means “remembrance of the Passover offering, eaten while full”. This last piece of the matzo eaten is called afikoman and many explain it as a symbol of salvation in the future.

The Passover Seder meal is full of symbols of salvation, including the opening of the door for Elijah and the closing line, “Next year in Jerusalem,” but the use of matzo is the oldest symbol of salvation in the Seder.

Passover this year started on April 22 and is ending on May 1. There’s still a few days to enjoy this during the holiday, but you can even enjoy it long after. Who says you can’t have chocolate covered matzoh after Passover ends? No one. And if someone says that, don’t talk to them anymore. You don’t need that negativity.

Chocolate toffee matzoh with sea salt.

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Milano cookie Easter bunnies!

(This was originally written for a contributor post on eighteen25, go take a look and see! And look for more posts by me over there soon.)

Hey guys and gals. I’m sorry for the lack of blog posts. I went almost an entire month without posting ANYTHING. I really am sorry. I know I’m lame- life is busy and it’s getting warmer. No excuse, I know, but today’s post is a super duper adorable one that I think you’re really going to LOVE.

BUNNIES!

Easter bunny Milano cookies!

I’m insane, I know. You’re thinking, “Really?!” But yes. You’re probably also thinking “Why didn’t I think of that!?”

I had this idea a while ago, and I never actually implemented it. But I wanted to for so long that this year I finally had to. I really didn’t know what to use, how to do it, etc. But it all came together and I had everything I needed in my house.

Easter bunny cookies!

What you need:

  • Milano cookies
  • White chocolate or white Candy Melts (I used Baker’s white chocolate)
  • sprinkles for eyes/nose
  • black food coloring (optional)
  • paper for ears

Originally, I planned on using Oreos covered in white chocolate, and just make bunny faces. But I bought a package of Milano cookies for the first time in forever and I realized… they’re BUNNY SHAPED. Well, not really. But kinda.

Easter bunny cookies.

I also used the new banana Milanos, which I think are really good. You can use any kind you want, obviously. Mint. Raspberry. Plain. Whatever.

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Depression era hipster cake.

I’m all about old timey things. I always say I was born in the wrong era- I should’ve been born around 1900 so I could have been a “flapper.” I love everything about the 1920’s/1930’s and I am obsessed with vintage everything. I collect vintage Pyrex/Depression glass/jadeite and vintage cookbooks. And vintage canning jars.

I’m just an old soul.

Anyway, I saw this cake over at gbakes.com and I knew I had to make it. Women during the Great Depression (and during WWII) were the original hipster vegans. Just not by choice. They had Victory Gardens, used butter & eggs rarely. And meat? It was a treat. I myself haven’t made a “cake” in quite some time. So when it involved such little effort and no eggs/butter? Hey. I’m there.

Depression era hipster vegan cake.

The best thing about this, though, is that it’s relatively cheap. And you don’t have to go run out and make sure you have the ingredients. I mean, most people have all the ingredients on hand- whether you’re vegan or not. Vinegar? Everyone has it. Canola or vegetable oil? Same. And most folks have cocoa powder. Which, by the way, is definitely vegan, whether you choose to use Dutched or regular. I like Hershey’s Special Dark myself.

The finished product kind of looks like a composition book, doesn’t it? Haha. Also: darkest cake I’ve ever made. Yes, I used dark chocolate but still. This cake is so dark it’s black.

Depression era hipster vegan cake.

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Rocky road (of life) brownies.

Guys, I’m sorry. I’m trying really hard to keep up the posts here, but honestly I haven’t been inspired. I’m hoping for some sweet Valentine’s Day inspo soon, but right now the rivers of ideas in my brain have run dry.

However, today, we shall feast like kings.

Rocky road brownies with homemade marshmallows, chocolate chunks and walnuts.

So this happened. Yup. I was sitting home Saturday night, thinking how much I’d love a brownie. Then I saw the marshmallows I made. And the Oxo container filled with walnut halves. And I thought, “Why just REGULAR brownies? Why not SUPER BROWNIES?!” And then while writing this, I realized… rocky road… rocky road of life… because you know, I’m sitting here being dramatic and pouting that I haven’t posted enough at the blog this year (so far). *siiiiiiigh*

The really cool thing about these is that they’re 100% made from scratch. I mean, I didn’t grow the cacao or the walnuts. I probably could- I had an aunt who had a walnut tree in her yard. But I made the marshmallows from scratch, and the brownies. Pretty neat. They’re as homemade as you can get. Look at them:

Rocky road brownies; covered with homemade marshmallows, chocolate chunks and walnuts.

Right? RIGHT?! Insanity. Insane in the membrane. Intensity in 10 cities.

Imagine, if you will, these babies crumbled- or just plunked- on ice cream. I know. Stop. Your brain is gonna explode. Calm down.

Do they make up for the lack of posts from me?

Rocky road brownies; homemade marshmallows, chocolate chunks and walnuts topping rich chocolate brownies.

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Mini-bundt gingerbread cakes with brandy icing and sugared cranberries.

Mini-bundt gingerbread cakes with sugared cranberries.

So, hey guys… I made some mini-bundt gingerbread cakes. Cutest little things. And add to them some cute little sparkly sugared cranberries. Ugh. Forget it. Are visions of sugarplums- or sugared cranberries- dancing in your head? It’s Christmastime, folks! I know! So exciting. It’s such a busy time of year, I know, but I hope you all take some time to spend with your families and friends. It’s easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle and forget that not only are we all human- but what’s important.

Beautiful things don’t always have to be complicated. Simple is beautiful too. And I promise you that these little mini gingerbread bundts are simple. Don’t be scared by the sugared cranberries!

Mini-bundt gingerbread cakes with sugared cranberries.

Gingerbread is so Christmas, it’s practically mandatory. If you let a holiday season go by without making gingerbread, it’s almost sacrilegious. I decided to up the ante and add another holiday favorite: cranberries. And let’s not forget brandy, another holiday staple.

So yeah. Mini-bundt gingerbread cakes. They’re so beautiful… and also just plain adorable. But SIMPLE. Just a few ingredients, a little bit of mixing and tossing and whisking and voila. Gorgeous little cakes to serve after a holiday meal. And they’ll make you feel all Martha Stewart-y.

Mini-bundt gingerbread cakes with sugared cranberries.

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Classic Christmas chocolate chip cookies!

Wow, look at that alliteration in the title. Enough to bring a tear to an English teacher’s eyes. Okay, anyway… cookies! It’s that time of year! Everyone is baking away this month. Between Hanukkah and Christmas and all the parties and events that are going on, there are a LOT of cookies being passed around. Sometimes they’re traditional “Christmas” cookies- gingerbread men, gingerbread trees. Or maybe sugar cookies in the shape of a Star of David with blue icing. I remember making cookies and confections with my mom by the dozen- magic bars, sugar cookies, stroufala, gingerbread, Russian tea cookies, etc. It was the most fun thing ever.

But what about the classic chocolate chip cookie? How come that doesn’t have a bigger place in our Christmas baking?

Chocolate chip oatmeal cookies. A Christmas cookie classic.

Who DOESN’T love a good chocolate chip cookie?! These particular cookies happen to have oats in them, which makes them a little heartier and not just your average chocolate chip cookie. The oats make them a bit chewier, which is nice. Plus they transport well, and are easy to store- not delicate at all!

Perfect for kids, teachers, whoever you want to bake up a gift for.

Chocolate chip oatmeal cookies.

CHOCOLATE CHIP OATMEAL COOKIES

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup solid vegetable shortening
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • one 12-ounce bag semi-sweet chocolate chips

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease baking sheets with vegetable oil.
  2. Combine flour, salt, and baking powder in in a small bowl.
  3. Beat together shortening, sugars, and vanilla in large bowl with an electric mixer until creamy. Add eggs, beating until light and fluffy. Gradually beat in flour mixture and rolled oats. Stir in chocolate chips.
  4. Drop batter by well-rounded teaspoonfuls onto baking sheet. Bake for 8-10 minutes for a soft chewy cookie or 12-14 for a more “Chips Ahoy” texture.
  5. Cool cookies on sheets for 2 minutes. Remove to wire rack to cool completely.

Chocolate chip oatmeal cookies. A Christmas classic cookie.

I like using wide mouth Ball or Kerr jars to gift them in. Just stack ’em up in the jars once they’re cooled, close the jars with lids & bands and then tie pretty ribbons and gift tags on them. I also like using cardboard pastry boxes from places like Pick Your Plum or Wilton. It just dresses them up a little.

Can I tell you that these are the best chocolate chip cookies ever? They are. My co-workers are STILL TALKING ABOUT THEM and I brought them in the week of Thanksgiving. I am not joking. I’ve had requests for them every day since.

Chocolate chip oatmeal cookies!

If you want to make them look a little more festive, you can replace the chocolate chips with either red & green M&M’s or Nestle’s red & green colored semi-sweet morsels. You can also add nuts if you like. They’re great the way they are, but a little cookie experimentation never killed anyone.

Chocolate chip oatmeal cookies.

  Suggestions for use: eat ’em!
Soundtrack: “Merry Christmas” – The Waitresses
Sources & credits: 16 ounce (pint) Kerr wide mouth jar; freshpreserving.com

Dutch apple-pumpkin crisp.

One particularly nasty, cold, and quite rainy afternoon in late October, I decided to use the remainder of my leftover pumpkin puree and the apples I had left (that were barreling straight towards being “too soft to use”). I knew I had to use up both of these things sooner rather than later, and I couldn’t imagine in what way I’d do it. Two apples aren’t really enough for a pie, and these weren’t pie apples anyway. And one scant cup of pumpkin puree is probably enough for muffins or cupcakes, but… been there, done that, yanno? How many pumpkin muffins can one person eat!?!?

I contemplated pumpkin-applesauce, but two small apples aren’t really enough for a good amount of sauce. I didn’t think it was worth the effort.

Dutch apple-pumpkin crisp.

Thankfully, Google is our friend. I found this recipe by Betty Crocker and adapted it to suit my needs (I do not currently own a microwave). It’s a great way to use up leftover pumpkin puree that may or may not be on the verge of tossing, and maybe a few straggler  “soft spotted” apples, too.

I love making these “crisps” or “breakfast thingies.” I’ve made summer stone fruit versions, and berry varieties that were more cake-y. The addition of oats not only makes it heartier but makes it versatile; it almost screams HAVE ME FOR BREAKFAST, TOO! And it’s so cool and autumn-y out. The leaves are all pretty reds and yellows. Ya just need somethin’ like this to eat on a November morn.

dutchapplepumpkincrisp3

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